Enneagram

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Enneagram

The Enneagram defines 9 personality types (check out the book by Don Richard Riso). The history of the Enneagram is that knowledge was passed down from guru to disciple for thousands of years, until early this century when Gurdjieff and the Arica Institute took an interest in it and wrote it down.

Within each personality type a further 9 levels of “health” are defined.  A healthy person tends to move in the direction of the arrow taking on the positive traits of the next personality type.  An unhealthy person degenerates in the opposite direction, and the US psychiatric disorders correspond with the categories of unhealthy people in this model.

There are two basic types of people, the 3-6-9 type and the 1-4-2-8-5-7 type.

Integration: 1 – 7 – 5 – 8 – 2 – 4 – 1, or 9 – 3 – 6 – 9
Disintegration: 1 – 4 – 2 – 8 – 5 – 7, or 9 – 6 – 3 – 9

Each person has a major type plus a wing, which is a percentage of the characteristics of one adjacent side.  The combination of these along with varying levels of health and integration/disintegration, is a vast number of personality types – thousands, not just a few generalised boxes (which many people detest being categorised into).